i am not sure that means what you think it means (II): there’s a good chance the question has not been begged because no one begged it

begging the question ≠ raising the question

the folks at this site discuss the dangers and prevalence of ‘BTQ abuse.’

they note: Beg the question does not mean “to raise the question.” (e.g. “It begs the question, why is he so dumb?”) This is a common error of usage made by those who mistake the word “question” in the phrase to refer to a literal question. Sadly, the error has grown more and more common with time, such that even journalists, advertisers, and major mass media entities have fallen prey to “BTQ Abuse.”

While descriptivists and other such laissez-faire linguists are content to allow the misconception to fall into the vernacular, it cannot be denied that logic and philosophy stand to lose an important conceptual label should the meaning of BTQ become diluted to the point that we must constantly distinguish between the traditional usage and the erroneous “modern” usage. This is why we fight.

this may also be a good time to review the 2007 consideration of the logical structure of “this is why i’m hot.”

*thanks, jq!

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